A Companion to American Fiction 1780-1865 by Shirley Samuels

April 3, 2017 | American Literature | By admin | 0 Comments

By Shirley Samuels

Content material:
Chapter 1 nationwide Narrative and the matter of yankee Nationhood (pages 7–19): J. Gerald Kennedy
Chapter 2 Fiction and Democracy (pages 20–30): Paul Downes
Chapter three Democratic Fictions (pages 31–39): Sandra M. Gustafson
Chapter four Engendering American Fictions (pages 40–51): Martha J. Cutter and Caroline F. Levander
Chapter five Race and Ethnicity (pages 52–63): Robert S. Levine
Chapter 6 classification (pages 64–74): Philip Gould
Chapter 7 Sexualities (pages 75–86): Valerie Rohy
Chapter eight faith (pages 87–96): Paul Gutjahr
Chapter nine schooling and Polemic (pages 97–107): Stephanie Foote
Chapter 10 Marriage and agreement (pages 108–118): Naomi Morgenstern
Chapter eleven Transatlantic Ventures (pages 119–130): Wil Verhoeven and Stephen Shapiro
Chapter 12 different Languages, different Americas (pages 131–144): Kirsten Silva Gruesz
Chapter thirteen Literary Histories (pages 147–157): Michael Drexler and Ed White
Chapter 14 Breeding and analyzing: Chesterfieldian Civility within the Early Republic (pages 158–167): Christopher Lukasik
Chapter 15 the yankee Gothic (pages 168–178): Marianne Noble
Chapter sixteen Sensational Fiction (pages 179–190): Shelley Streeby
Chapter 17 Melodrama and American Fiction (pages 191–203): Lori Merish
Chapter 18 soft obstacles: Passing and different “Crossings” in Fictionalized Slave Narratives (pages 204–215): Cherene Sherrard?Johnson
Chapter 19 medical professionals, our bodies, and Fiction (pages 216–227): Stephanie P. Browner
Chapter 20 legislation and the yankee Novel (pages 228–238): Laura H. Korobkin
Chapter 21 exertions and Fiction (pages 239–248): Cindy Weinstein
Chapter 22 phrases for kids (pages 249–261): Carol J. Singley
Chapter 23 Dime Novels (pages 262–273): Colin T. Ramsey and Kathryn Zabelle Derounian?Stodola
Chapter 24 Reform and Antebellum Fiction (pages 274–284): Chris Castiglia
Chapter 25 the matter of the town (pages 287–300): Heather Roberts
Chapter 26 New Landscapes (pages 301–313): Timothy Sweet
Chapter 27 The Gothic Meets Sensation: Charles Brockden Brown, Edgar Allan Poe, George Lippard, and E. D. E. N. Southworth (pages 314–329): Dana Luciano
Chapter 28 Retold Legends: Washington Irving, James Kirke Paulding, and John Pendleton Kennedy (pages 330–341): Philip Barnard
Chapter 29 Captivity and Freedom: Ann Eliza Bleecker, Harriet Prescott Spofford, and Washington Irving's “Rip Van Winkle” (pages 342–352): Eric Gary Anderson
Chapter 30 New England stories: Catharine Sedgwick, Catherine Brown, and the Dislocations of Indian Land (pages 353–364): Bethany Schneider
Chapter 31 Harriet Beecher Stowe, Caroline Lee Hentz, Herman Melville, and American Racialist Exceptionalism (pages 365–377): Katherine Adams
Chapter 32 Fictions of the South: Southern images of Slavery (pages 378–387): Nancy Buffington
Chapter 33 The West (pages 388–399): Edward Watts
Chapter 34 The outdated Southwest: Mike Fink, Augustus Baldwin Longstreet, Johnson Jones Hooper, and George Washington Harris (pages 400–410): David Rachels
Chapter 35 James Fenimore Cooper and the discovery of the yank Novel (pages 411–424): Wayne Franklin
Chapter 36 the ocean: Herman Melville and Moby?Dick (pages 425–433): Stephanie A. Smith
Chapter 37 nationwide Narrative and nationwide background (pages 434–444): Russ Castronovo

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Hobomok and other Writings of Indians. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press. (First publ. ) Cooper, James Fenimore (1982). Gleanings in Europe: England, ed. Donald A. Ringe, Kenneth W. Staggs, James P. Elliott, and R. D. Madison. Albany: State University of New York Press. (First publ. ) Cre`vecœur, J. Hector St. John de (1981). Letters from an American Farmer, ed. Albert E. Stone. New York: Penguin. (First publ. ) Grimes, William (1999). Life of William Grimes, the Runaway Slave (first publ.

Now, take any race of animals, confine them in idleness and inaction, whether in a sty, a stable, or a stateroom, pamper them with high diet, gratify all their sexual appetites, immerse them in sensualities, nourish their passions, let everything bend before them, and banish whatever might lead them to think, and in a few 26 Paul Downes generations they become all body and no mind; and this, too, by a law of nature, by that very law by which we are in the constant practice of changing the characters and propensities of the animals we raise for our own purposes.

41) shape political life into recognizable and appealing esthetic forms. Well-crafted narrative is central to politics, as it is to fiction. When Ratcliffe later belittles George Washington (‘‘A fair military officer, who made many blunders . . A respectable, painstaking President . . This government can show today a dozen men of equal abilities’’ [p. 78]), he earns Madeline’s disapproval and opens the door to doubts about his character. She longs for heroic leadership, but she finds banal corruption.

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